Hazen's Notch Association     Bringing People Together to Conserve Vermont's Natural Resources   

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Hazen's   Notch   Association
Bringing People Together to Conserve Vermont's Natural Resources
 ____________  Education Programs  ____________

General Info

Mission

Education Staff

Conservation Lands

                

Winter Programs       Spring Programs        Summer Camp          Fall Programs

 






























General Information

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The Hazen's Notch Association offers schools and other groups a variety of natural science field programs that can be tailored to students in Kindergarten through 12th Grade, as well as for adults. Program fees vary according to program, group size and time length. The range of program fees is from $3.00 to $7.00 per person.





Our Mission

The Hazen's Notch Association (HNA) is a non-profit, member-supported, conservation organization located in Montgomery, Vermont. The HNA was founded in 1994 to promote and engage in conservation of open lands, environmental education, outdoor recreation, scientific research, and stewardship of natural resources. Please help the HNA achieve these goals by becoming a member. Membership Form



HNA Education Staff


The HNA Staff is made up of enthusiastic and effective educators who have backgrounds in environmental studies, outdoor education, natural resources management and outdoor recreation. Rolf Anderson, Debbie Benjamin and Kelly Evans, have been outdoor educators for over 20 years, teaching children, adults and families of all ages year-round.

Our staff members are our greatest asset and have as their highest goal to provide your group with the most rewarding educational experience possible. They will encourage your students to expand their knowledge of and love for the natural world.



Hazen's Notch Conservation Lands


Most HNA programs take place on the 500-acre Hazen's Notch Conservation Lands, a privately owned conservation area. These conservation lands are comprised of 2 preserves: the Bear Paw Pond Area (100 acres) on the Hazen's Notch Road and the High Ponds Farm (400 acres) on the nearby Rossier Road, both in the Hazen's Notch area of Montgomery, Vermont.

Some special natural features of these preserves include numerous beaver ponds, large rock outcrops, glacial erratics, and a 125-tree apple orchard. Several streams flow through a mixed hardwood/softwood forest, old pasture, and meadow glade. This wonderful range of habitats support a great diversity of plant and animal species.

Several miles of woods roads and trails provide excellent routes for exploring the natural features on these nature preserves.




Hazen's Notch Summer Camp    l    A Vermont Children's Nature Camp


Three one-week sessions of Day Camp for ages 6-12 and two one-week sessions of Overnight Camp for ages 10-14 will be offered this, our 17th year.

See the Summer Camp page for complete information.









 

Education Programs  
SPRING 2011

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Bluebirds of Vermont
Eastern Bluebirds


The Eastern Bluebird is a beautiful bird and has an interesting life history that includes the New England landscape as it has changed over time. We will learn about the bird's special habits and its nesting requirements at the High Ponds Farm where bluebirds have nested in manmade nest boxes as well as natural tree cavities for many years. Come visit us at the High Ponds Farm or we can come to your classroom and share with you details about this bird's life cycle. Whether at the High Ponds Farm or at your school, your class may participate in building bluebird nest boxes from kits designed by the Hazen's Notch Association.

 

 

Owls of Northern Vermont
Birds of Prey


Owls have evolved over millions of years to be some of the most successful predators of the night by adaptations to basic anatomy - especially of feathers, eyes and ears. Through pictures, recordings and discussion, we will learn about the owls that occur in northern Vermont year-round and some of those that may only be seen in the Winter months - from the diminutive Northern Saw-whet Owl to the familiar Barred Owl to the grand Great Gray Owl and others.

 

 

 

 

Frogs and Toads
Amphibians of Vermont

Frogs and Toads are an essential part of enjoying Summer since we get to explore their many habitats in and around wetlands. In this program, we will learn about 6 species of frogs and 1 species of toad that occur in northern Vermont through pictures and recordings while visiting Moosewood Ponds. We will also learn about efforts to research and gather information through The Vermont Reptile & Amphibian Atlas Project and the Vermont Vernal Pool Mapping Project.





Forestry Trail
Learning About Trees As We Go

An interpretive nature walk on either the Bear Paw Pond Area or the High Ponds Farm, concentrating on the study of trees. We'll look at the deciduous and coniferous trees of the northern forest: maple, ash, birch, spruce, fir and hemlock. We'll learn how to tell them apart and how man and wildlife make use of them. In Autumn we use color and cones for clues; in Winter bark, branching habit and buds tell the story; in Spring tree flowers reveal each tree species. The trees of Vermont's mountains are easy to know in any season with our simple key to trees.



Wetlands Ecology
Ponds, Bogs, Beavers & Frogs

We'll explore the High Ponds Farm and its complex of beaver ponds, beaver lodges and beaver meadows on the Hazen's Notch Conservation Lands. Beavers have a fascinating life cycle we can learn about as well as learning how other animals use the beaver's habitat. Vermont has 8 species of frogs, many of which make these ponds their home. We'll learn the different calls and distinctive markings of the frogs as we walk the Wetlands Interpretive Trail around Moosewood Ponds.


Ecology Field Trip
Understanding Nature's Web

This is an interpretive nature walk at either the Bear Paw Pond Area or the High Ponds Farm focusing on the subject of ecology. We'll study the natural resources found in a variety of plant communities and wildlife habitats that we pass through, looking for signs of the different birds and animals which use the area. Tracks, bird song, scat and food sources all teach us to observe signs of animals which are not always easy to see. Our walk will take us through hayfield, old pasture, a wet meadow, a mixed hardwood/softwood forest, an evergreen plantation, and to one or more ponds and a stream.


Botany
Learning to Identify Plants

From lichens and moss to flowers and ferns, we'll show your class some common plant friends and ways to tell them apart. Animals and people benefit from plants in so many ways. We'll share with you some of what we have learned about the many uses plants provided for Native Americans and their many modern uses. From edible and medicinal to just plain beautiful, plants have so much to give. We'll learn how to use a basic key to identify plants and come away from our walk with a better appreciation of the plant world.



The Long Trail
A Vermont Legacy

Let us introduce your class to the Long Trail. HNA Co-Director and Green Mountain Club Past President Rolf Anderson is your guide to the LT, America's oldest long distance hiking trail. We'll follow the trail to one of its numerous shelters and learn about the history of the LT and its importance to Vermonters. Along the way we'll pause to look at map lichen, club moss, wood sorrel, bear claw marks and mountain ash. This class will cover some geography, geology, ecology and advice on hiking the trail safely.




Education Programs 
FALL 2011

Forestry Trail
Learning About Trees As We Go

An interpretive nature walk on either the Bear Paw Pond Area or the High Ponds Farm, concentrating on the study of trees. We値l look at the deciduous and coniferous trees of the northern forest: maple, ash, birch, spruce, fir and hemlock. We値l learn how to tell them apart and how man and wildlife make use of them. In Autumn we use color and cones for clues; in Winter bark, branching habit and buds tell the story; in Spring tree flowers reveal each tree species. The trees of Vermont痴 mountains are easy to know in any season with our simple key to trees.


The Glaciology of Vermont
Erratics, Tarns & Morraines

Learn how ancient glaciers and modern streams created the landscape of Vermont and New England. Read the story of erosion as we follow the glacier痴 tracks along the Flood Brook drainage beneath Burnt Mountain on the High Ponds Farm. We値l see glacial erratics as we trace the route of ice and water to the Missisquoi River Valley. Students will come away from this field trip able to recognize how glaciers past and rivers present have and continue to shape our Vermont landscape.


Ecology Field Trip
Understanding Nature痴 Web

This is an interpretive nature walk at either the Bear Paw Pond Area or the High Ponds Farm focusing on the subject of ecology. We値l study the natural resources found in a variety of plant communities and wildlife habitats that we pass through, looking for signs of the different birds and animals which use the area. Tracks, bird song, scat and food sources all teach us to observe signs of animals which are not always easy to see. Our walk will take us through hayfield, old pasture, a wet meadow, a mixed hardwood/softwood forest, an evergreen plantation, and to one or more ponds and a stream.


Botany
Learning to Identify Plants

From lichens and moss to flowers and ferns, we値l show your class some common plant friends and ways to tell them apart. Animals and people benefit from plants in so many ways. We値l share with you some of what we have learned about the many uses plants provided for Native Americans and their many modern uses. From edible and medicinal to just plain beautiful, plants have so much to give. We値l learn how to use a basic key to identify plants and come away from our walk with a better appreciation of the plant world.


The Long Trail
A Vermont Legacy

Let us introduce your class to the Long Trail. HNA Co-Director and Green Mountain Club past President Rolf Anderson is your guide to the LT, America痴 oldest long distance hiking trail. We値l follow the trail to one of its numerous shelters and learn about the history of the LT and its importance to Vermonters. Along the way we値l pause to look at map lichen, club moss, wood sorrel, bear claw marks and mountain ash. This class will cover some geography, geology, ecology and advice on hiking the trail safely.


Trails for Schools Program
Kids In Action

The HNA has built interpretive ecology trails at several schools including Montgomery, Richford, Berkshire, Fairfield, Sheldon, Bishop Marshall School (Morrisville) and Washington (VT) Elementary. Working with faculty and students, the HNA inventories the natural resources present on school property and develops a plan for building one or more trails that can be used as an outdoor classroom, taking students through a variety of habitats. Students are lead by HNA staff through a wide variety of activities that culminate in a completed trail, with a map and brochure. Call or write if you would like to discuss a trail project for your school. Read about the Chester A. Arthur Trails Project with the Fairfield School.




Education Programs
WINTER 2009-2010

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Snowshoeing


Snowshoeing is the perfect way to explore the hidden places outdoors where skiers sometimes have difficulty traveling. We'll make our way along narrow, wooded trails and across open meadows, looking for signs of wildlife and learning about nature in winter as we go. Several loop hikes take in a variety of habitats and provide equal amounts of recreation, learning and fun. Bring your own equipment or rent from us. This program is suitable for 1st Grade through Adult with snowshoes available for all sizes of people.



Winter Ecology of Beaver Ponds

The 400-acre High Ponds Farm has an active beaver family on 2 different complexes of 4 beaver ponds. Here we can snowshoe over the frozen ponds and see the beaver lodges up close. We'll learn about the life cycle of a beaver family and how they build dams and lodges and store food for winter. We'll also identify tracks and other signs of grouse, weasel, coyote and moose as well as look for animal homes.



Winter Adaptations


While snow can be fun for people, too much of it can make life hard for animals. Some animals migrate to warmer regions, some hibernate, and others remain active throughout winter. We'll learn how animals survive winter outdoors by adapting to the cold. We will make a quinzee or "bee hive" style snow cave or igloo. In this activity students can learn how snow can keep people and animals alive in severe cold.



Cross-Country Skiing


Join the HNA staff for a fun-filled skiing skills program on the groomed trails at Hazen's Notch. Bring your own equipment or rent skis, boots and poles from us. We'll provide thorough instruction and provide "trail tips" on guided tours appropriate to the students' abilities. Discover the freedom cross-country skis provide in this life-long, healthy and affordable activity. This program can accommodate skiers from 1st Grade through Adult.

 

 




Hazen's Notch Winter DayCamp    l    A Vermont Children's Winter Camp


Cross country skiing, snowshoeing, sledding, & snow caves - winter outdoor fun for ages 6-12 during the February school vacation. Winter Day Camp - Monday through Friday, 9-4, lead by HNA education staff.

See the Calendar of Events page for complete information.





This page was last updated on January 2, 2012

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Copyright 2001-2012 Hazen's Notch Association for the Environment, Inc.  All Rights Reserved.

  Hazen's Notch Association  l  P.O. Box 478  l  Montgomery Center VT 05471  l  info@hazensnotch.org  l  802.326.4799